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Showing posts with the label Philae

Good Morning Philae!

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After seven months of hibernation in a dark corner of a lonely comet 67P, Philae has finally woken up! At 2228 CEST, The European Space Agency, received about 85 seconds of communication from the lander that made the comet 67P/ Churyumov/ Gerasimenko its home in November last year.

In the 85 seconds of contact that Philae made via its mothership, Rosetta (read 5 reasons why Rosetta is a Superstar), scientists at the Lander Control Center at the German Aerospace Center received some data packets that show that Philae had probably woken up earlier but failed to contact Earth.

Nevertheless, Philae's battery is now recharged 24 Watts of its 140 Watt Hour capacity and will get better as the comet is approaching the Sun. Philae's revival also means that scientists can now get access to all the data that Philae had recorded before it went into hibernation but could deliver to Earth.

There are exciting days ahead for Philae as life lives his life on a comet and for the ESA who will h…

Rosetta update: Philae's landing site chosen and a 3D model of the Rosetta mission!

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Having analysed all the landing site options in depth, the European Space Agency (ESA) has finally made its choice for the landing site for Rosetta's probe, Philae. After shortlisting five probable sites earlier, the ESA had to go back to its longer list of probable landing sites after the sites were found not be be safe for landing Philae
After much deliberation and rethinking,  the ESA is looking at site J as the possible landing place for Philae and will now make its decision final by September 26 after completing trajectory analysis. If our readers recollect, the landing mission of Philae is going to be completely autonomous with no possibility of real time maneuvering after the probe leaves Rosetta. The ESA therefore needs to be absolutely sure that the landing site is perfect for probe, not only to land, but also have sufficient lighting for Philae to be able to charge its batteries and continue his analysis of the comet's surface after landing. Also, site C has been …

Rosetta Update: Landing site options not very safe [Coffee-byte]

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In an interesting turn of events, scientists at the European Space Agency are having a difficult time determining the perfect landing spot for Rosetta's probe, Philae. An earlier update from the agency at the beginning of the month had revealed that 5 landing spots had been shortlisted from the the probable list of 10 chosen first. 

But further analysis of these sites has shown that none of them seem safe enough for Philae to land. Rosetta has been returning high resolution images of these probable sites of landing and the comet 67P seems to have layered cliffs along most of the landing sites that have been identified so far. Philae needs a landing strip close to 1 km long and hitting one of the layered cliffs might end its mission prematurely. 

The comet's duck shaped body does not make life easier as well. There is sufficient landing space on some other sites on the comet but due to their location, they do not have access to sunlight which means that batteries on the probe …

5 reasons that make Rosetta a SUPERSTAR!

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For the next few days (and probably many many years), you are likely to come across people speak of the greatness of 'Rosetta' and about her achievements and before you start thinking that the Rosetta is some entrepreneur, social worker, sportswoman or the worst, a movie star, let us make it very clear that Rosetta is actually a spacecraft. and still a Superstar!

Here are 5 things that have make Rosetta famous!

Rosetta, is a spacecraft built by the European Space Agency, at a cost of 1.3 billion Euros, with the aim to study the comet 67P/ Churyumov- Gerasimenko. Discovered in 1969, the comet orbits around our Sun every 6.6 years and Rosetta's mission to understand what this comet is made up. The mission will give us scientists further information on how our Solar System originated and evolved, since our Sun, planets and all the comets are made up of the same pre-solar nebula that existed over 4.6 billion years ago. Approved in the year 1993, the mission was launched in Mar…