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Showing posts from November, 2021

Meet the author: They Made What? They Found What?

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Photo credit: Shweta Taneja.  In this brand new series on our blog, we will bring you interviews with some of the leading authors from the world of science.  Author Shweta Taneja We kick-off the series with an interview with Shweta Taneja , the author of the two-in-one book, They Made What? They Found What? Published earlier this year, the book covers ground-breaking discoveries and inventions made by Indian scientists in a wide range of scientific fields from molecular physics to thermodynamics, nanotechnology to evolutionary biology. Shweta resides in Bangalore and has authored seven books, along with a host of non-fictional writings about technology for leading digital outlets.    Coffee Table Science (CTS): You have written fiction in the past. But this book is different. What was the inspiration to write the book?   Shweta Taneja (ST):  I’m a journalist, editor, and creative writer. For a decade when I started writing fiction, I focused on science fiction and fantasy, but when t

Making Vaccine injection as easy as lighting a gas stove.

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Photo by Mat Napo on Unsplash Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a new vaccine delivery system that works like a gas stove lighter. With a simple click of the button, this new delivery system, called ePatch,  that does not need any battery or power to operate can deliver vaccines in a pain-free manner, according to a paper in PNAS .  Conventionally, single-use needles and syringes are used to deliver vaccines. While some people have the fear of needles, there is also the risk of needle-stick injuries to healthcare workers. According to estimates from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), there are up to three million needle-stick injuries that occur globally with about half not being reported. Apart from risks to healthcare workers, needles and syringes are also a huge part of medical waste that is generated every year. The ePatch vaccine delivery system uses microneedles which could reduce the amount of waste generated every year. 

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